COVID-19 and kids: Do you know myth from fact?

kids walking down a sidewalk all wearing masks
Do you know myth from fact when it comes to kids and COVID-19? (Image: Adobe stock; Illustration: Dave Chrisom, Boston Children's)

As COVID-19 continues to spread across the United States, there is still much misinformation and confusion about how kids are affected by the illness. Test your knowledge by taking our quiz.

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Myth or Fact? Kids are immune from the coronavirus.

Myth. While it’s true that fewer cases of coronavirus have been reported in children than in adults, kids are not immune. And the number of cases of COVID-19 in children has been steadily rising since March.

Myth. While it’s true that fewer cases of coronavirus have been reported in children than in adults, kids are not immune. And the number of cases of COVID-19 in children has been steadily rising since March.

Myth. While it’s true that fewer cases of coronavirus have been reported in children than in adults, kids are not immune. And the number of cases of COVID-19 in children has been steadily rising since March.

Myth or Fact? Children who get COVID-19 can sometimes get very sick.
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Fact. Although most children do not become severely ill from COVID-19, some do become quite sick and need to be hospitalized. Some children also develop a condition called multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), which can affect the whole body. Doctors are still learning more about this rare condition and why it only affects some children.

Fact. Although most children do not become severely ill from COVID-19, some do become quite sick and need to be hospitalized. Some children also develop a condition called multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), which can affect the whole body. Doctors are still learning more about this rare condition and why it only affects some children.

Fact. Although most children do not become severely ill from COVID-19, some do become quite sick and need to be hospitalized. Some children also develop a condition called multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), which can affect the whole body. Doctors are still learning more about this rare condition and why it only affects some children.

Myth or Fact? Kids can’t spread the coronavirus.
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Myth. We have known for quite some time that children can spread the coronavirus to others. This means it’s important for kids to follow the same precautions as adults, such as wearing masks (for kids ages 2 and older), staying at least 6 feet away from others, and washing hands often.

Myth. We have known for quite some time that children can spread the coronavirus to others. This means it’s important for kids to follow the same precautions as adults, such as wearing masks (for kids ages 2 and older), staying at least 6 feet away from others, and washing hands often.

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Take our previous quiz and get more answers about Boston Children’s response to COVID-19.

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